Dec CFA Level I 2014 Results Roundup – Pass Rate Increases to a Whopping 44%

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By Christine

The results are out – how did you do?

After a long wait – the question that has been bugging you has now been answered. At just a few minutes past 9am ET, the results are finally here, and individual results emails are flying in, being opened and read as this is being typed.

Here’s a quick Q&A to round-up today’s CFA Level I results, and our guide on what to do next.


Where’s your actual score?

If you’re new to the CFA exams, you might be a bit confused by the results email format and its contents. (And if you haven’t gotten it yet, don’t fret, everyone gets them at different times as the emails take time to be sent out.)

Unfortunately the CFA Institute does not publish your detailed score. You will receive a Pass / Fail grade and in the case of a Fail, an additional Band 1-10 score (10 indicating the closest to a Pass grade). You will also receive a categorical score on your exam topics – just 3 categories: 0-50%, 51-70%, 71% and above. 

In other words, your results format will approximate this example:

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Estimate an instant score and see where you sit with everyone else using our free tool.

Although you don’t get an exact score, you can easily estimate one. Just enter your results in our free Results Analysis tool, and you’ll get:

  • The minimum and maximum ranges of your score
  • An instant estimate of your score using the 40/60/80 methodology
  • A comparison on where you stand on the results distribution curve of 300 Hours readers

You can enter your results using the form below, or in our Results Analysis page.


How does the pass rate compare with other years?

The December 2014 pass rate has continued to improve on recent trends, which is quite saying something. In June 2014 and December 2013, the pass rates were 42% and 43%, the highest pass rates since June 2009, and this year takes it further to a whopping 44%.

Here are the pass rates for the past few years, and below that is a chart of all historical datapoints as a comparison (mouse over to interact). We’ve got more historical pass rate data here.

Pass rates for recent L1 exams:

  • DECEMBER 2014 – 44%
  • June 2014 – 42%
  • December 2013 – 43%
  • June 2013 – 38%
  • December 2012 – 37%


What do you do next?

Pass – consider taking CFA Level II this year if you haven’t decided already

The whole point of passing December exams, in our opinion, is that you’ll be able to get a shot at June Level II in 5 months’ time, possibly going on to complete all 3 levels in just 18 months (just like Sophie did). 

It is a tough undertaking, but in the end it is an extra option to possibly finish your exams one year earlier. We’d advise you to take it if it is at all possible in your case. There is definitely enough time if you register and prepare now!

Fail – you can try again soon, this time with more experience!

We’ve had our share of failure experiences as well within the team, so we know what you’re going through. The optimistic way of looking at this is that you’ll be much better prepared than other Level I candidates for next time around – you actually have sat for the real thing before and know what to expect. Focus on that when you’re preparing for your next exam, and you’ll perform much better, I promise you.

You can also read these articles to help you with your result. But don’t spend too much time dwelling on it – focus on looking forward!

Take advantage of our CFA material offers for your next preparation cycle

One of the ways we try and help CFA candidates is through our Offers page, where we have constantly-updated offers on CFA material that can save our readers some money. Before you buy your materials, make sure you check out our Offers page first and see if there is any offer you can take advantage of!

Join the conversation in our Forum

We know the CFA exam is an important step in your professional life, and we love hearing our readers stories in our 300 Hours Forum. If you’d like to share yours, or have any question you’d like to ask (however random), just post a new discussion in our forum now, or simply comment below!

Zee Tan
Author: Zee Tan

 

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