A Change in Name is in Order?

A Change in Name is in Order?

  • This topic has 12 replies, 9 voices, and was last updated Jul-17 by mattyc.
  • Author
    Posts
    • Sarah
      Participant
      Up
      0
      Down

      This is a pretty controversial topic but it has been bothering me for a few weeks now and I can’t help but wonder if it would make a difference. So for a bit of background I was born and raised in the outskirts of Toronto, the worlds more multicultural capital.

      My mentor is an exacting sort and demands perfection in everything. A single comma out of place is not tolerate and he always offered wonderful advice. Something he once said but I dismissed because surely stuff like this didn’t happen in Toronto.

      You might be puzzled about what I am going about, as I realize I haven’t given this discussion much of a topic yet. So what was it that my mentor said? It was along the lines of,

      “You are going to work ten times harder as your peers because you are female, you are a minority and your religion affiliations aren’t doing you any favours.”

      I dismissed it because I grew up in such a diverse community but I’ve read the reports about job candidates with equal footing in everything qualifications except one with the “Caucasian” sounding name was preferred.

      So the question is, is it the name? Would you do a bait and switch strategy with your own name?

    • Zee Tan
      Keymaster
      Up
      2
      Down

      I’ve not really found that kind of effect where I work. I do have a ethnicky name and have wished I had a more mainstream name, but only because it’s hell for other people to spell.

      Personally I won’t do it. Your name is something your parents gave you – treasure it!

    • Sarah
      Participant
      Up
      0
      Down

      I’d never actually change my name, far too stubborn of that. I didn’t get this far in life by listening to every piece of advice people give.

      But I do know people who have changed their name and I wondered is it because that didn’t like their original name or because they buckled under peer pressure.

      I read an article some time ago that in Belgium (I think, I can’t find the article) resumes didn’t even include the applicants name to reduce as much personal bias as possible.

      So I wonder how much of a disadvantage these factors actually cause me and how to compensate.

    • Zee Tan
      Keymaster
      Up
      2
      Down

      There will always be biases as long as there is human nature though.

    • Sarah
      Participant
      Up
      2
      Down

      @Zee you are right. I have more important things to contemplate.

    • Sophie Macon
      Keymaster
      Up
      4
      Down

      Nah, changing your name is succumbing to what was said. I personally think there are more factors than a name that affects an application. So don’t worry @diya, it sounds lovely.

    • lulu123
      Participant
      Up
      1
      Down

      @Diya

      there were studies conducted to check how employers react to various CVs being sent in

      they checked male vs. female names

      and ethnic vs. american names

      and unfortunately, males and american names got more calls for interviews
      (even if the employers claimed to hire a diverse crowd)
      (AND even if the ethnic/female candidates had better qualifications and longer experience in the workforce!!!)

      there is not much we can do against this bias
      just live for yourself and act the way you would want others to act in return to you

      changing your name could probably help you with the aforementioned type of situation (i.e. blind calls) but technically, once the person knows you or whatnot, they would end up knowing where you are from, etc…

      so might as well keep what your mama gave you! haha

    • Sophie Macon
      Keymaster
      Up
      4
      Down

      @diya, it’s like saying, I might as well have a sex change, name change, colour change etc. You can’t do that just to fit into a mould, you are unique as you are!

    • Snippy
      Participant
      Up
      0
      Down

      @Diya Best thing to do would be to work for a while and then start your own firm and then you can show the rest of the world that you aren’t part of this “common human nature”.

    • AjFinance
      Participant
      Up
      4
      Down

      @diya, it’s like saying, I might as well have a sex change, name change, colour change etc. You can’t do that just to fit into a mould, you are unique as you are!

      +1

      @Diya Its something similar to the way you cannot really make “everyone” happy or keep everyone satisfied. To be honest, people who have such biases and think along these lines, will never be satisfied, no matter what you do to confirm to their expectations. They’ll always find out something thats wrong.

      Speaking in a broad sense of the idea, its just a waste of time and effort trying to change yourself to confirm to others expectations 🙂

      One day our descendants will think it incredible that we paid so much attention to things like the amount of melanin in our skin or the shape of our eyes or our gender instead of the unique identities of each of us as complex human beings. ~Franklin Thomas

    • hairyfairy
      Participant
      Up
      0
      Down

      Racial/cultural bias and sexism are tough ones to address. Of course humanity tries to combat it via law and policy, but human bias is hard to stamp out.

    • bthera
      Participant
      Up
      3
      Down

      The study about the names is unfortunately all too true. Many people I studied with in my university days were Chinese and had very traditional names. They found it much easier to give themselves an “English” Nickname for introductions, networking and on their resume. Many potential employers worry (especially for recent graduates) about their communication skills when they read a Non-American name.

      I am by no means saying change your name or even legally change your name but having an “English” or American nickname can really go a long ways when networking and applying. Once hired or in the workplace many people embrace multiculturalism and different holidays and generally respect each other.

      I also work in Canada in a city that is very multicultural and accepting. Always remember hiring decision are often done by an older white male with last generations ideals. I think the wave of youth multiculturalism and acceptance still needs to time to reach upper management.

    • mattyc
      Participant
      Up
      5
      Down

      As someone who has one of the most common male names in America over the last 50 years (Matthew) I would tell you to embrace your individuality. I think its a strength rather than a hinderance.

Viewing 12 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.